National Farm Safety and Health Week

Posted on

Did you know there are more farm injuries related to animal agriculture than crop production? During this National Farm Safety and Health Week, National Pork Board Director of Producer Learning and Development Karen Hoare highlights the resources available to pig farmers and their employees.

Host

Don Wick

Guests

Karen Hoare, Director of Producer Learning & Development, National Pork Board

Length

06:31

Transcript

Don Wick: 00:00 From the Pork Checkoff in Des Moines Iowa, it’s Pork Pod. Pork Pod, a look at the hot topics in today’s pork industry. The Pork Checkoff is working for you through various forms of research, promotion, and consumer information projects. I’m Don Wick speaking on behalf of the Pork Checkoff, and today our guest is Karen Hoare, the director of producer learning and development with the National Pork Board. And this is National Farm Safety and Health Week. And Karen, let’s talk about it. What kind of things should we keep in mind with this special recognition of farm safety week?

Karen Hoare: 00:31 Yeah, no, absolutely. So, it’s like you said, it’s National Farm Safety Week and we want to make sure that producers stay safe out there, not only in the barns, you know, where we have injuries from animal handling and things like that producers do every day. But also at this time of year, you know, because we want to remember the producers are probably doing other things that are, you know, less directly connected to pig care, things like harvesting grain, they drive on the roads perhaps more than they would normally. So we want to remind people to stay safe in those operations too.

Don Wick: 01:02 So what role does the Pork Checkoff have in getting this message out?

Karen Hoare: 01:08 Yes, so again, we have some resources to help producers stay safe, mostly on the farm. That’s where we focus most of our efforts because that’s where producers spend most of their time. So we have some resources that we still see such as the Safe Pig Handling resource, which provides training and information in both English and Spanish. We have computer-based training, we have PowerPoints, we have support for trainers and videos and things like that on topics that people need to think about when they’re handling pigs. So for example, the first thing you need to think about is what is the pig’s behavior? Well, how do I understand what the pig is thinking, what the pig is doing, why it’s behaving this way? And from that, you can then learn and train on other pieces directly related to the specific tasks that you’re doing in the barn to keep you safe so you don’t get hurt when you’re handling animals. Just things that we do every day. So whether it’s handling boars, or loading market hogs, or vaccinating and treating, or different things you have to think about if you’re working in a group housing environment that might be different than if you’re handling pigs in stalls. So we have that resource that you can access on the National Pork Board website. And again, lots of ways to learn about these different things and to train your employees on these different things. Another thing that we have is the Employee Safety Toolkit, which is a bit broader. It’s the type of thing that OSHA might require to do training on for your farm employees. And that covers 21 topics and we cover from bloodborne pathogens right the way through to zoonosis.

Karen Hoare: 02:46 You know, some of the issues that we deal with in pig production, so with that, including the confined spaces. Just general housekeeping, lock out-tag out, just remembering to wear proper personal protective equipment or PPE. And again, so we have those, again, those resources in different formats to help you, whichever works best for you on the farm. Whether it’s short four to seven minute videos, or whether it’s a PowerPoint presentation if you want to train a group of employees, or there’s some posters that you can put up. So those types of things. So there’s the two key resources that we help, that we provide for producers in the barn to help keep them safe.

Don Wick: 03:33 Pork operations, so unique. Obviously the family’s involved, as you mentioned, the employee is a big part of this story as well.

Karen Hoare: 03:41 Exactly. Yeah. And it’s interesting you say that because when we look at the numbers of injuries and illnesses on the farm, you know, [inaudible] the president, when he proclaimed the National Farm Safety and Health Week last week, he mentioned that there are 581 workers in 2017 were killed or died from work related injuries in agriculture. So, but not only that, we have a lot of people who were just injured. In 2017, we had an injury rate of 7.7, which means that 7.7 people out of every hundred full time workers were injured. But that doesn’t include, as you mentioned, barns that have less than 11 employees. So those numbers are not considered. So we have to remember that we have, you know, as you say, families on the farm as well that we need to keep safe, especially children. We have, we see a lot of injuries, and tragically, deaths, children on farms as well because they, you know, we forget about keeping them safe. They get into situations that, you know, we have perhaps as an adult we’re used to, we accept, but they get themselves into situations when they get hurt. So. Yep. You’re absolutely right. We’ve got to think about family members and keep communicating to children how to stay safe around animals.

Don Wick: 05:00 Karen, do you find that there’s differences between say livestock production, animal agriculture versus crop production or are those in the produce sector?

Karen Hoare: 05:11 Yeah, there are different, there’s in fact, you know, pork production, again, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, we have a high rate of incidence rate of injuries in pork production than we do in crop production. Which is interesting. I mean, we see, of course, production, crop production, we have the issue much more of transportation and those types of things, with farmers on the road perhaps, but we also have the additional, it has it in pork production of those, of being around the pigs that we see more injuries from handling animals. You know, they don’t behave how we always expect them to and they do things that might be a little bit erratic. And if we were not prepared for that, we can find ourselves being injured, and quite serious injuries too. Knees is a big area that we see a lot of injuries to our workers.

Don Wick: 06:01 It’s good to have a week like this. You mentioned the resources. Where can folks find that? Where’s it available?

Karen Hoare: 06:07 Yep. So those resources are all available on the National Pork Board website, which is pork.org. And if you hit the tab that says “Farms”, and then “Tools”, you’ll find all the resources that we have. Not only safety, but all the resources that we provide to help our pork producers.

Don Wick: 06:23 Thank you for listening to this edition of Pork Pod. For more information on this topic or the Pork Checkoff itself, remember to visit pork.org.

Don Wick: 00:00 From the Pork Checkoff in Des Moines Iowa, it’s Pork Pod. Pork Pod, a look at the hot topics in today’s pork industry. The Pork Checkoff is working for you through various forms of research, promotion, and consumer information projects. I’m Don Wick speaking on behalf of the Pork Checkoff, and today our guest is Karen Hoare, the director of producer learning and development with the National Pork Board. And this is National Farm Safety and Health Week. And Karen, let’s talk about it. What kind of things should we keep in mind with this special recognition of farm safety week?

Karen Hoare: 00:31 Yeah, no, absolutely. So, it’s like you said, it’s National Farm Safety Week and we want to make sure that producers stay safe out there, not only in the barns, you know, where we have injuries from animal handling and things like that that producers do every day. But also at this time of year, you know, because we want to remember the producers are probably doing other things that are, you know, less directly connected to pig care, things like harvesting grain, they drive on the roads perhaps more than they would normally. So we want to remind people to stay safe in those operations too.

Don Wick: 01:02 So what role does the Pork Checkoff have in getting this message out?

Karen Hoare: 01:08 Yes, so again, we have some resources to help producers stay safe, mostly on the farm. That’s where we focus most of our efforts because that’s where producers spend most of their time. So we have some resources that we still see such as the Safe Pig Handling resource, which provides training and information in both English and Spanish. We have computer based training, we have PowerPoints, we have support for trainers and videos and things like that on topics that people need to think about when they’re handling pigs. So for example, the first thing you need to think about is what is the pig’s behavior? Well, how do I understand what the pig is thinking, what the pig is doing, why its behaving this way? And from that you can then learn and train on other pieces directly related to the specific tasks that you’re doing in the barn to keep you safe so you don’t get hurt when you’re handling animals. Just things that we do every day. So whether it’s handling boars, or loading market hogs, or vaccinating and treating, or different things you have to think about if you’re working in a group housing environment that might be different than if you’re handling pigs in stalls. So we have that resource that you can access on the National Pork Board website. And again, lots of ways to learn about these different things and to train your employees on these different things. Another thing that we have is the Employee Safety Toolkit, which is a bit broader. It’s the type of thing that OSHA might require to do training on for your farm employees. And that covers 21 topics and we cover from bloodborne pathogens right the way through to zoonosis.

Karen Hoare: 02:46 You know, some of the issues that we deal with in pig production, so with that, including the confined spaces. Just general housekeeping, lock out-tag out, just remembering to wear proper personal protective equipment or PPE. And again, so we have those, again, those resources in different formats to help you, whichever works best for you on the farm. Whether it’s short four to seven minute videos, or whether it’s a PowerPoint presentation if you want to train a group of employees, or there’s some posters that you can put up. So those types of things. So there’s the two key resources that we help, that we provide for producers in the barn to help keep them safe.

Don Wick: 03:33 Pork operations, so unique. Obviously the family’s involved, as you mentioned, the employee is a big part of this story as well.

Karen Hoare: 03:41 Exactly. Yeah. And it’s interesting you say that because when we look at the numbers of injuries and illnesses on the farm, you know, [inaudible] the president, when he proclaimed the National Farm Safety and Health Week last week, he mentioned that there are 581 workers in 2017 were killed or died from work related injuries in agriculture. So, but not only that, we have a lot of people who were just injured. In 2017, we had an injury rate of 7.7, which means that 7.7 people out of every hundred full time workers were injured. But that doesn’t include, as you mentioned, barns that have less than 11 employees. So those numbers are not considered. So we have to remember that we have, you know, as you say, families on the farm as well that we need to keep safe, especially children. We have, we see a lot of injuries, and tragically, deaths, children on farms as well because they, you know, we forget about keeping them safe. They get into situations that, you know, we have perhaps as an adult we’re used to, we accept, but they get themselves into situations when they get hurt. So. Yep. You’re absolutely right. We’ve got to think about family members and keep communicating to children how to stay safe around animals.

Don Wick: 05:00 Karen, do you find that there’s differences between say livestock production, animal agriculture versus crop production or are those in the produce sector?

Karen Hoare: 05:11 Yeah, there are different, there’s in fact, you know, pork production, again, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, we have a high rate of incidence rate of injuries in pork production than we do in crop production. Which is interesting. I mean, we see, of course, production, crop production, we have the issue much more of transportation and those types of things, with farmers on the road perhaps, but we also have the additional, it has it in pork production of those, of being around the pigs that we see more injuries from handling animals. You know, they don’t behave how we always expect them to and they do things that might be a little bit erratic. And if we were not prepared for that, we can find ourselves being injured, and quite serious injuries too. Knees is a big area that we see a lot of injuries to our workers.

Don Wick: 06:01 It’s good to have a week like this. You mentioned the resources. Where can folks find that? Where’s it available?

Karen Hoare: 06:07 Yep. So those resources are all available on the National Pork Board website, which is pork.org. And if you hit the tab that says “Farms”, and then “Tools”, you’ll find all the resources that we have. Not only safety but all the resources that we provide to help our pork producers.

Don Wick: 06:23 Thank you for listening to this edition of Pork Pod. For more information on this topic or the Pork Checkoff itself, remember to visit pork.org.