About

Background
In October 2014, the National Pork Board officially announced that a new common swine industry audit platform for pork producers, packers and processors was certified by the Professional Animal Auditor Certification Organization (PAACO) and was available to the public. Part of the driving force to create the new audit tool stemmed from the Pork Checkoff’s Board of Directors who met with their European counterparts in 2011. These overseas producers complained about audit programs in their countries that were duplicative, costly and inefficient.

The concept of a common audit was first introduced at the 2013 National Pork Industry Forum and reintroduced at the 2014 World Pork Expo in Des Moines, where a coalition of packers and pork producers explained how the audit is a credible and affordable solution for improving animal well-being.

Goal of Audit Tool

The overarching goal of the common audit process is to provide consumers greater assurance of the care taken by farmers and pork processors to improve animal well-being and food safety. The audit tool builds on the existing Pork Quality Assurance® Plus (PQA Plus®) program and expands it to serve as a single, common audit platform for the pork industry.

To help avoid duplicative, costly and inefficient audit programs that are commonplace in some countries, this new tool is designed to:

  • Meet individual company and customer needs.
  • Be focused on outcome-based criteria that measure and improve animal welfare.
  • Provide clarity to producers about audit standards and expectations.
  • Minimize duplication and prevent over-sampling.
  • Ensure greater integrity of the audit process through consistent application.
  • Provide an objective, science-based platform to facilitate continuous improvement in animal care.

Audit Materials

The Common Swine Industry Audit materials include:

  • Audit instructions that outline the scope and objectives of the audit, instructions for biosecurity, selecting animals for observation, and tips for conducting an audit.
  • Audit standard covers 27 key aspects of swine care and pre-harvest food safety through all phases of production.
  • Audit Tool contains the specific audit questions and their point values an auditor will use to evaluate compliance with the audit standard

 

*Common Swine Industry Audit (English Version)
Instructions, Standards, and Audit Tool
2017 Version Coming Soon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Common Swine Industry Audit (Spanish Version)
Instructions, Standards, and Audit Tool
2017 Version Coming Soon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


*Corrective Action Report

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Interactive Audit Tool

Audit Tool contains the specific audit questions and their point values an auditor will use to evaluate compliance with the audit standard

 

*These files are best used on a desktop computer, not on a mobile or tablet device. Download and save directly to your desktop for full functionality, if not the format will not work properly.

Audit Resources

NEED HELP Preparing for a Common Swine Industry Audit or PQA Plus® Site Assessment?
The National Pork Board is pleased to provide additional resources to help producers prepare for the Common Swine Industry Audit (CSIA) and PQA Plus Site Assessment.

The modules can be completed individually or as a complete series. Currently, the English modules are available on a flash drive and the Spanish modules will be available in February. Both English and Spanish versions will be available for download in the spring of 2017.

Each module is approximately 10 minutes in length and provides producers with background information on the topic, what auditors will be evaluating and then asks producers to complete exercises to confirm their knowledge. These training modules produce a certificate of completion and can be used to satisfy the annual caretaker training requirement of the CSIA.

Fill out the below form to request shipment of CSIA Training Modules on a USB

  • If you need to order more than 10 CSIA Training Modules USB drives, please contact the Pork Checkoff Service Center, Mon - Fri 8:00am - 5:00pm Central at 1-800-456-7675

 


The Common Swine Industry Audit (CSIA) requires several Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) in the recordkeeping section and producers often find writing SOPs for their farm to be a daunting task. To assist, the National Pork Board has created a dynamic SOP Toolkit that allows producers to create customized SOP documents. The toolkit has basic text for each SOP required in the CSIA then allows producers a series of questions to edit and customize the documents to reflect procedures conducted on their farm. After finishing the steps to make the SOP their own, producers will have a completed SOP to print and show to auditors. The toolkit will  offer templates for all eight SOP documents required by the CSIA and PQA Plus® Site Assessment.  Access each SOP template below.


Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) Toolkit Templates

  1. Daily Pig and Barn Care
  2. Euthanasia (coming soon!)
  3. Animal Handling  (coming soon!)
  4. Piglet Processing  (coming soon!)
  5. Feeding and Watering  (coming soon!)
  6. Caretaker Training  (coming soon!)
  7. Treatment Management  (coming soon!)
  8. Emergency Action Plan  (coming soon!)
  9. Mortality Management  (coming soon!)

Below are a series of Pork Checkoff resources compiled to assist producers in preparation for an audit.  All of these resources are customizable templates or references for producers to use on their farm.

Willful Acts of Abuse

Animal Welfare Policies
EnglishSpanish 
See It Stop It Poster
EnglishSpanish

Thermal Comfort/Air Temperature

PQA plus GPP 9 page 64
EnglishSpanish

Caretaker Training

Individual Development Plan
EnglishSpanish
Group Training Record
EnglishSpanish
Individual Training Record
EnglishSpanish

Humane Euthanasia

Written Euthanasia Action Plan
EnglishSpanish
Humane On-Farm Euthanasia of Swine Guidelines
EnglishSpanish
Humane On-Farm Euthanasia of Swine Training Module
English and Spanish
Euthanasia Blunt force Trauma Standard Operating Procedure
EnglishSpanish
Euthanasia CO2 Standard Operating Procedure
EnglishSpanish
Euthanasia Penetrating Captive Bolt Standard Operating Procedure
EnglishSpanish 

Transport/Load-out

Transport Quality Assurance®
TQA Lesson 4 Page 25
English

Animal Care/Abuse Policy and ReportingAnimal Welfare Policies
EnglishSpanish 
See It Stop It Poster
EnglishSpanish
Whistle Blower Policy
English

Animal Handling

Safe Pig Handling Tool
English and Spanish
TQA – Lesson 2 Page 12 – 17
English

Needle and Sharps Usage

PQA plus GPP 4 page 29-31
EnglishSpanish

BiosecurityBiosecurity Checklist
EnglishSpanish

Space Allowance

Sows and Space
EnglishSpanish
PQA Plus GPP 9 page 68
EnglishSpanish

Piglet Processing Procedures

Tail Docking Standard Operating Procedure
English
Castration Standard Operating Procedure
English

Facilities

PQA Plus GGP 9 Page 66
EnglishSpanish

Body Condition Score

PQA Plus GPP 9 page 67
EnglishSpanish

Air Quality

PQA plus GPP 9 Page 66
EnglishSpanish

Site Assessments

PQA Plus Site Assessment Guide

Lameness

Identifying, Treating, and Preventing Lameness in Sows
EnglishSpanish

Emergency Backup System

PQA plus GPP 9 Page 64
EnglishSpanish
Power Failure Test Record- Alarm System
English Spanish 
Power Failure Testing – Backup Generator
English Spanish 
Power Failure Testing – Emergency Curtain Drops
English Spanish 

Self-Assessment Tool
EnglishSpanish

Lesion Scoring

Shoulder Lesions in Sows
English

PQA Plus GPP 9 page 69
EnglishSpanish

Written Euthanasia Plan

Written Euthanasia Action Plan
EnglishSpanish
Humane On-Farm Euthanasia of Swine Guidelines
EnglishSpanish
Humane On-Farm Euthanasia of Swine Training Module
English and Spanish
Euthanasia Blunt force Trauma Standard Operating Procedure
EnglishSpanish
Euthanasia CO2 Standard Operating Procedure
EnglishSpanish
Euthanasia Penetrating Captive Bolt Standard Operating Procedure
EnglishSpanish 

Daily Observation Records

Daily Observation Record
EnglishSpanish

Treatment Management

Farm Medication Plan
EnglishSpanish
Medicated Feed Mixing Record
EnglishSpanish
Pen Individual Treatment Record
English Spanish
Gilt/Sow/ Boar Treatment Record
EnglishSpanish
Vaccination Management Schedule for Breeding
EnglishSpanish
Vaccination Management Schedule for Non-Breeding
EnglishSpanish

Feed/Water Access

Feeding And Water For Lactating Sow
EnglishSpanish 
Feeding Breeding and Gestating Sow
EnglishSpanish 
Feeder Adjustments
EnglishSpanish 

Pork Safety

Farm Medication Plan
EnglishSpanish
Medicated Feed Mixing Record
EnglishSpanish
Pen Individual Treatment Record
English Spanish
Gilt/Sow/Boar Treatment Record
EnglishSpanish
Vaccination Management Schedule for Breeding
EnglishSpanish
Vaccination Management Schedule for Non-Breeding
EnglishSpanish
Vet/Client/Patient/Relationship
EnglishSpanish
Confirmation of No Medications Administered Record
EnglishSpanish


Manuals/Standard Operating Procedures

These are all templates and must be customized for your farm. A general template can be used to expand your standard operating procedure manual.

Euthanasia

Euthanasia Blunt force Trauma Standard Operating Procedure
EnglishSpanish
Euthanasia CO2 Standard Operating Procedure
EnglishSpanish
Euthanasia Penetrating Captive Bolt Standard Operating Procedure
EnglishSpanish 

Animal Handling

Loading Pigs into Farrowing Rooms Standard Operating Procedure
Spanish 
Load-Out Market Hogs Standard Operating Procedure
EnglishSpanish 
Loading Pigs into Rooms Standard Operating Procedure
EnglishSpanish 
Weaning Standard Operating Procedure
EnglishSpanish 

Piglet Processing

Tail Docking Standard Operating Procedure
EnglishSpanish 
Castration Standard Operating Procedure
EnglishSpanish 

Feeding and Watering

Feeding And Water For Lactating Sows
EnglishSpanish 
Feeding Breeding and Gestating Sows
EnglishSpanish 
Feeder Adjustments
EnglishSpanish 

Daily Observation

Daily Pig and Barn Care Standard Operating Procedure
EnglishSpanish 
Daily Observation Record
EnglishSpanish

Use the Daily Pig and Barn Care SOP Toolkit!

Caretaker Training SOP

Caretaker Training
English

Treatment Management

Identifying Fall-Behind Pigs and Treatment Pen Management
EnglishSpanish Version

Emergency Action Plan

Emergency Action Plan
English
Emergency Action Plan Tool/ Farm-level Crisis Plan
English Only

Mortality Management

Removing Dead Animals Standard Operating Procedure
EnglishSpanish 

Mortality Records
Coming Soon

Common Industry Audit Frequently Asked Questions

What are the goals of the new Common Swine Industry Audit?

The goals of the new Common Swine Industry Audit are to:

  • Provide stakeholders with a consistent, reliable and verifiable system that assures on-farm animal well-being and pre-harvest food safety.
  • Eliminate duplication and minimize the administrative burden placed on producers.
  • Develop consensus about consistent standards between and among various independent audit programs.
  • Create a standard process that results in observer consistency and protection of herd health through biosecurity protocols.

 

Why was the Common Swine Industry Audit created?

Third-party auditing is a widespread, recognized and valued practice within the food production industry and is one component of a comprehensive commitment to building and maintaining the trust of customers and consumers. Third-party audits can bring transparency, credibility and assurance of process compliance to production units and provide useful feedback for continuous improvement.

The 2013 Pork Industry Forum delegates passed a resolution encouraging the National Pork Board to work with the various packers and other industry stakeholders to develop a common foundation for on-farm animal welfare audits, facilitate equivalency among packers, and minimize the need for multiple audits on a farm that supplies multiple packers. The common foundation for the audit would be based on Pork Quality Assurance® Plus (PQA Plus®) and Transport Quality Assurance® (TQA®).

 

Who was involved in the development of the Common Swine Industry Audit?

In 2013, a task force of industry stakeholders – including producers, veterinarians, animal scientists, packers, processors and retail and foodservice representatives – were tasked with developing a workable, credible and affordable common on-farm audit system for the swine industry. The common audit materials were submitted for external academic review and underwent beta testing to:

  • Determine the approximate amount of time required to conduct an audit on sites of various sizes and phases of production.
  • Determine if the audit tool and standard provide necessary clarity to auditors on how to evaluate audit criteria.
  • Validate that the scoring mechanism is appropriate and provides an accurate summary of the conditions of the site and pig management.
  • Gather input from the perspective of third-party auditors who have experience with on-farm auditing.
  • The task force reviewed feedback from the academic review and beta testing and made changes to strengthen the quality of the materials.

How was the Common Swine Industry Audit developed?

The task force developed the Common Industry Audit standard while considering scientific evidence, ethics and economics, which are the three factors that must be balanced for the swine industry to remain sustainable. The world and the marketplace are dynamic, and so the Common Industry Audit standard also must remain dynamic. The task force will consider revisions to the Common Industry Audit Standard on an annual basis by reviewing results of aggregated audit data, new scientific discoveries, changes in the marketplace and evolving consumer trends. Balancing these inputs on a consistent basis and adapting the Common Industry Audit standard will foster pro-competitive continuous improvement within the U.S. pork industry.

What does the Common Swine Industry Audit cover?

The Common Swine Industry Audit materials include:
  • Audit instructions: This section provides instruction for auditors by defining the scope and objectives of the audit; defines a site, gives instructions for biosecurity, animal sampling and selection; and offers tips for conducting an audit.
  • Audit standard: This section covers 27 key aspects of swine care and pre-harvest food safety through all phase of production. The audit covers the full life cycle of the pig while on the farm, including pig handling and load-out for transportation. The audit is designed to be independent of housing designs, size of operation or geographical location. Four primary areas will be reviewed during the audit: records, animals, facilities and caretakers.
  • Audit Tool: This section contains the specific questions and their point values an auditor will use to evaluate compliance with the audit standard.

The Common Swine Industry Audit is PAACO Certified. What does this mean?

Certification of audit instruments is one of the services offered by the Professional Animal Auditor Certification Organization (PAACO). Its welfare auditor trainings and certification of auditors for meat plants and poultry have become an industry standard. In order to become PAACO-certified, the program must be submitted for a third-party review by a species-specific panel of animal welfare experts appointed by PAACO and overseen by a PAACO representative. The group initially critiques the audit for improvements and primarily evaluates it to determine if the audit meets all 12 minimum criteria established by the PAACO board of directors for a certifiable audit instrument. The criteria apply to all meat-animal species. PAACO has granted Certified Audit status to the Common Swine Industry Audit.

Where can I access the Common Swine Industry Audit materials?

All of the materials for the Common Swine Industry Audit can be found at www.pork.org/commonaudit.

 

 

What resources are available for producers to help them prepare for an audit?

There are several resources currently available for producers to help them prepare for an audit. Fact sheets, record templates and training materials can be accessed at www.pork.org/commonaudit.

 

 

I have several production sites.  Do the audit results of one farm apply to all of my farms?

No. Audit results apply only to the specific site that is audited. A site is defined by its standard premises identification number (PIN). A PIN is assigned when a producer registers the site through a state, tribal or federal animal health authority that obtains the PIN through the USDA APHIS PIN allocator. A standard PIN is made up of seven alphanumeric characters that uniquely identify a specific geographic location. Registration and contact information for each state can be found by contacting the Pork Service Center at (800) 456-7675.  An on-farm third party audit must include all pigs and facilities located at the geographic location identified by the PIN.

If an audit is completed on my farm, do I still need to complete a PQA Plus site assessment?

Yes. The site assessment and audit have different purposes and outcomes. The PQA Plus site assessment is an educational and benchmarking tool that provides measurement and feedback from the PQA Plus advisor on effectiveness of training and management to ensure pig well-being.

The audit is completed by an independent party who provides verification that the animal well-being system is working as designed. There is no education component to the audit; rather it is an objective snapshot in time of the farm and is one element of the animal well-being assurance process.

 

 

If I have recently completed a PQA Plus site assessment on my farm, will that count as a third-party audit?

No. Again, the site assessment and audit have different purposes and outcomes. The PQA Plus site assessment is an educational and benchmarking tool that provides measurement and feedback from the PQA Plus advisor on the effectiveness of training and management to ensure pig well-being.

The audit is completed by an independent party to provide verification that the animal well-being system is working as designed. There is no education component to the audit, rather it is an objective snapshot in time of the farm and is one element of the animal well-being assurance process.

 

 

Who is eligible to perform an audit on my farm using the Common Swine Industry Audit?

The audits should be conducted by a third-party auditor. This person should be independent of the farm and should not be in a personal, professional or economic relationship that would lead to a potential/perceived conflict of interest. Ideally, auditors should be part of an accredited auditing company that provides in-house training, specific auditing protocols and ethical auditing standards.

 

 

Is training available for third-party auditors?

The qualifications of an auditor and the training they receive can have a large impact on observer variability. Auditors are expected to be objective and stay within the scope of the audit tool they use, limiting their activities to auditing and not consulting on results. Auditors are expected to conduct themselves in a professional manner and adhere to American Society for Quality (ASQ) professional auditing protocols. The PAACO is in the process of developing an auditor training and certification course specific to on-farm swine auditing.

Will auditors be required to follow biosecurity protocols?

It is critical that the auditor does not compromise the biosecurity of a swine farm. The auditor does not want to be responsible for introducing a disease to the farm or spreading a disease within the farm.  To efficiently conduct on-site verification, the auditor needs to understand the biosecurity protocols he or she will be subject to, as well as the physical layout of the operation. Many farms have established biosecurity protocols that should be adhered to by the auditor. This includes required hours of downtime, personnel entry procedures and if and how external equipment/materials can be brought into the site. In the event of a farm not having a biosecurity protocol, the auditor still needs to follow basic biosecurity principles defined in the Common Swine Industry Audit instructions.

How long does it take to perform an audit?

The time needed to complete an audit will depend on the type and size of the farm and the ease of access to needed records. Based on the beta test, it takes an average of two hours to complete an audit for wean-to-finish sites and four hours for breeding sites.

How is the audit scored?

There are five audit questions that are considered critical and do not have point values. If any of these criteria are found to be unacceptable, the site will automatically fail the audit. Even if there is an automatic failure, the remainder of the audit should be completed during the visit to gather the rest of the data for the site. Each remaining audit question is assigned a number of points. If a site meets the minimum standard, full points will be awarded for the question. If a site does ¬not meet the minimum standard, no points will be awarded for that question. A site cannot earn partial points for any audit question.

The audit tool is designed to provide a score for each section (animal/benchmarking, caretaker, facility, records, food safety and loading and transport) and an overall score for the site. Section scores allow for better interpretation of the overall audit score. The underlying data collected by the auditor is provided with the scores to provide context to the scores.

No minimum passing score has been established. Rather, section and overall audit scores for an individual site are presented compared to aggregated audit scores from the rest of the industry. Interpretation of scores must come from the buyers (e.g. packers, customers) in the marketplace.

 

 

What happens if an audit question is found to be unacceptable?

If an audit question is found to be unacceptable during the audit, producers are expected to complete a corrective action report to document that either the correction has occurred or that a plan is in place to address the issue in the future. Producers may choose to work with their PQA Plus advisors to complete the corrective action report. Corrective actions for areas considered critical must be completed within 10 calendar days from the site visit. Corrective actions for all other areas must be completed within 30 calendar days from the site visit.

What happens if my farm fails an audit?

Buyers in the marketplace (i.e. packers) will be responsible for reviewing audit results and approving corrective action reports to determine if their supplier has adequately resolved the identified issue and if the site requires a re-audit.

What happens if I refuse to be audited?

If a customer in the marketplace (i.e. packer) has asked you to complete a third-party audit as a condition of sale and you decline, it is up to the customer to decide if they continue to purchase from you as a supplier.

Do all farms have to be audited? How frequently will farms need to be audited?

This will depend on the market where you sell your pigs.

Who is paying for the audit to be completed?

This will depend on the market where you sell your pigs.

 

 

How will the Common Swine Industry Audit impact/affect/change/enhance PQA Plus?

The PQA Plus program is revised every three years. The Common Swine Industry Audit will provide direction for the next PQA Plus revision scheduled to be released in 2016. The changes will be reflected in both the producer education and the on-farm site assessment components of the PQA Plus program.

Contact

Have questions about the Common Industry Audit or need more information on the resources?
Contact: Jamee Amundson at JAmundson@pork.org
or 515-223-3534.